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HomeBike Reviews2023 Honda CB750 Hornet - long term bike review

2023 Honda CB750 Hornet – long term bike review

Earlier this year Two Wheel Addicts were lucky enough to be invited to Victoria for the Australian media launch of Honda’s CB750 Hornet. The event featured some signature Victorian wet weather riding conditions to get our first taste of the mid capacity naked. The event left us wanting more and of course some dry tarmac to really get to know the 2023 Hornet a little better.

So we jumped on the phone to the good folk at Honda Australia and in no time at all they ‘had arranged us a long term loan of the CB750 Hornet to test in varying conditions on some of our favourite local roads and give us a real world experience of what it is like to live with the Hornet.

We have now been living with the Hornet for around a month and a half and have put nearly 1,500klms on the bike thus far. This is Part one of a series we will bring the readers on the Hornet as we seek to find out if the 2023 Hornet still has its sting.

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Traditionally Honda Hornets of the past have been powered by in-line 4-cylinder power plants and the introduction of the new 755cc parallel twin certainly ruffled some feathers amongst purists.

2023 Honda CB750 Hornet
2023 Honda CB750 Hornet

The new motor produces a very user friendly 67kW of power and 75Nm of torque and also is the same power plant utilised in the recently released adventure variant the Transalp and could well find its way into the Yamaha R7 rival Honda is rumoured to be building.

Our test bike this time round is ironically the very same machine we piloted at the launch, meaning our Hornet features additional extras like a fly screen, rear seat cowl, heated grips and a quick shifter. The latter is a must if you’re considering the new CB750.

It was time to hit our local testing tracks with our Hornet and we were more than happy to see the sun, even if the temperature dial was set to chilly. At this point we can not express our gratitude enough for having being provided a Hornet fitted with heated grips.

Our Sunday morning ride would see us head out through Yarramolong on the Central Coast of NSW, head up Bumble Hill and stop for a coffee at popular bike hang out Jerry’s cafe at Kulnurra. From there we would head back along Old Pacific Highway or head to Wollombi depending on the mood of the group to conclude our weekly ride.

2023 Honda CB750 Hornet
2023 Honda CB750 Hornet

The early morning blast up Bumble Hill would illustrate the handling characteristics of the hornet well. With tight corners and constant changes of direction being the perfect proving ground for the bike. Riding the Bike between 6,500 and 9,000 rpm the Honda lapped up the uphill twisty conditions beautifully.

Offering good grip from the near new Michelin rubber and the easily manageable yet still engaging power plant performing well,, and gave us a chance to test out a few of the ride modes (the choices include Sport, Standard, Rain and Custom).

On the open country backroads, the 2023 Honda CB750 Hornet performs best in Sport, allowing you to make the most of the power available. From there, we doubled down with the Hornet, testing its commuter capabilities on work runs between Sydney and the Coast.

The Honda is nimble and perfect for lane filtering thanks to its 190kg kerb weight and 795mm seat height. Fuel economy is good, especially in Standard mode, averaging anywhere between 280km and 310km on a full tank of go-go juice.

2023 Honda CB750 Hornet
2023 Honda CB750 Hornet

The 5.0-inch TFT display offers good functionality and is clear to read, whether you’re flying up a mountain or navigating the urban jungle. Both the braking and suspension packages are up to the task, with a Showa 41mm inverted fork featuring on the front of the CB750.

It does feel a little light at first, but once you get the hang of its feel, the more confidence inspiring the package fitted to the 2023 Honda CB750 Hornet becomes. The rear suspension utilises a shock absorber that features five stages of pre-load adjustment.

Spring rate and damping settings are optimised to match the front fork, with 150mm of rear wheel travel. The front suspension offers 130mm of travel. Braking is handled via 296mm discs up front, with Nissin radial-mount 4-piston callipers.

On the rear, a 240mm disc provides the stopping power. All-in-all it’s a versatile and fun machine. It’s a sweet looking specimen with good handling characteristics, a great motor and some nice splashes of technology.

As far as bang for buck is concerned the Hornet is right up there, whether you’re looking for a weekend machine to have a blast with your mates on or a daily commuter, the Hornet is well worth a good hard look. Priced from $12,099 plus on-roads, it’s available in Pearl Glare White or Graphite Black (as tested).

2023 Honda CB750 Hornet
2023 Honda CB750 Hornet

Our test bike was supplied by Honda Motorcycles Australia. To find out more about the 2023 Honda CB750 Hornet contact your local Honda Motorcycles Australia dealer.

 

Andrew Jenkin
Andrew Jenkinhttp://twowheeladdicts.com.au
Andrew Jenkin is the founding editor of Two Wheel Addicts, ride editor at Exhaust Notes Australia, a contributor to BikeReview and Drivetribe as well as being a panel judge of Harley Davidson's Breakout Boss competition. Andrew has a love for anything on two wheels whether that be sports, naked or adventure bikes, with a guilty pleasure for cruisers.

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